Pop (art) will … drink itself – Andy Warhol’s Coca-Cola painting at auction – expected tab: $60 Million

Andy-Warhol-Pop-Art-Coca-Cola

Market fascination with the works of Andy Warhol seemed to have … fizzed out in recent times – at least a little – but a change is in the air, and it seems Christie’s isn’t going to miss out.

$60 million (44.17 million Euros) is what the auction house is betting on raking-in for the sale of a Coca-Cola bottle from 1962, by Warhol.

Not a silkscreen, rather a one-of-a-kind piece, the black and white work measures 69.3″ x 54″ (176,2 cm x 137,2cm).

Previously on Art is Life:

Andy Warhol “An American Story” at the Palazzo Blu in Pisa

15 Frames a Second of Fame from the Great Big Department Store in the Sky ____________ Go ahead Arty-Loos, you know you’re going to click on the link for the live webcam trained on Andy Warhol’s grave

Auctioneering! Warhol beats Picasso, becomes “Most Sold Artist of 2012″ … also besting the great Chinese artists of yesteryear’s Art Market tally

“Thank God it’s not Christmas” Andy Warhol and Truman Capote

Pop (art) will eat itself (con’t) … Andy Warhol eating a hamburger, 1981

“Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein” – A short film from 1966

Pop (art) will eat itself (con’t) … Warhol art floods the Art Market, … and the Supermarket

Andy Warhol – The Complete Picture (2002)

“Pop (art) will eat itself,” cont’d – the Warhol Foundation to sell part of the Pop artist’s collection of silkscreens, prints, photographs

Robert Hughes, “the greatest art critic of our time” … on Pop Art and Andy Warhol

Banksy served his own take on Warhol and pop art at MoMA – “buon appetito!”

Campbell’s Soup does Warhol – proving unequivocally that pop (art) will eat itself

“Pop (art) will eat itself,” con’t – Velvet Underground lose copyright fight over Andy’s Banana

Michelangelo’s David … by Feldmann and other modernist artworks visit Florence’s Accademia for “Arte torna arte”

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6 thoughts on “Pop (art) will … drink itself – Andy Warhol’s Coca-Cola painting at auction – expected tab: $60 Million

  1. There comes a point where all the art is sucked out of a piece when dubious ‘collectors’ make countless millions for a few minutes ‘work’. This, to my mind, is a prime example of why ‘art’ to the average man and women in the street is often dismissed as “rubbish”, and I’d have to say that in this instance I agree.
    A prime example of ‘Insider Greed’ sullying the otherwise beautiful world of art.

  2. Reblogged this on Make Something Mondays! and commented:
    I am not surprised to see an Andy Warhol original selling for so much, but there comes a point when I start to wonder when artwork becomes THAT valuable.

    As an artist myself I understand why art is expensive, especially if it is an original piece. However, I can’t imagine myself selling work that costs so much (even if I got to that level of success). Yes, the artist puts a lot of time and effort into their work, and yes, some supplies are expensive, but honestly, do you know how many cars you could buy with that amount of money? Or houses even…?

    What do you think? If you were an artist, would you charge $60 million for a single piece of work?

    • The issue of high market prices for art, to me, is both totally mysterious and a type of art in its own right. More than money Andy wanted fame… the prices estimated for the artworks are bets agreed-upon by the lawyers in the Warhol Trust and Christie’s. There’s a famous laugh that an allegedly drunk Robert Rauschenberg let out at Sotheby’s, in 1973, where his “Thaw” which he’d sold to a collector for $900 went for $85,000. Rauschenberg supposedly said to the collector after the sale: “It was only love. This is the divorce,” after which he supposedly punched him in the stomach, walked away, and never spoke to him again.
      The evening was captured on film, and the laugh has been immortalized – a work of Modern Art in its own right. I believe you can watch the whole boondoggle in Hughes’ “The Mona Lisa Curse” which we found online and posted a while back… it has since been taken down, but definitely look it up if you are interested in auctioneering.
      There’s an interesting article on the subject (which I found looking up the Rauschenberg incident) and it’s worth a read:
      http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/The-art-market-explained-4337
      Thanks for your comment and interest,
      : D

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